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Lemming
23rd January 2013, 02:17 PM
Attached is a photo of a surrender request dropped on Guam at the end of the Pacific War asking Japanese soldiers to stop fighting and come out of the jungle. This came from my mother's first husband who brought it back. My mother showed it to me when I was about 12 and she didn't know anything about it other than he said it was an announcement that the war had ended.

In 1992 I was working on a US Forest Service helicopter delivered fire fighting crew based at Ramona Airport north of San Diego. The USFS does not own any helicopters; since fire season is generally only a few months out of the year. it is not cost effective to maintain such expensive aircraft year round. The helos are contracted from private companies.

The company that provided the ship at Ramona's main job was training Japanese helicopter pilots at their headquarters in Orange county. This was very interesting to me...it was cheaper to bring the pilots over to the US to train than to do it in Japan! Anyway, somehow the subject of this document came up in a discussion with the pilot assigned to us in Ramona and he offered to get a translation from one of the Japanese student pilots. I made a photocopy and off it went.
Months later I received the translation below with a postscript "Translation by Mr Tomoyuki Hioki of Hiser Helicopters 2/2/93. The text is below. I was interested to find that Mr. Hioki had some problems as he said the language was very formal and archaic. I reproduce this here as received as to grammar, spelling, punctuation,capitalization, etc

"To: The Army, Navy, soldiers and Civilians in the Jungle of Guam Island
Date: 1945 August 16
From: Major Sato at Guam Island

I believe this is an exact report about our current condition to the officers and men who have sublime Japanese spirit and have been fighting fiercely for us in the jungle.

It is very unpleasant to say, we attacked towards South East Asia, but it didn't profit our empire. Also, the enemy dropped an atomic bomb which the world has seen kill the people in the whole city. In addition, the Soviets entered the war to defeat us, so it is very difficult to achieve our purpose of this war.

Mr. Ohuchiyama studied the current situation thoroughly, and it is forced to him to decide to stop the war and announce this to you. It seems that the only way that he can go is to retreat as quickly as possible.

We are perplexed because our situation has been changed so drastically, but Mr. Obuchiyama's orders keep our world away from atomic bombs, and he shows the way of development for our country. It seems that not only for the Imperial citizen, but the people all over the world were impressed with his consideration.

The war is over, but it seems that the Imperial household's authority will still contribute to the world. It is not a time to grieve about our personal matters but a crisis when we must work hard for the recovery of our country.
we

This retreat has been suggested to us by the U.S. Army. It is made to you by Mr. Sato (Commander) and some other Japanese officers with great passion. We must take extreme caution and retreat quickly from the jungle. All of you must trust and follow yourofficer's instructions and throw away any doubts. I hope that we will soon see your appearance (that has been fighting so hard) as soon as possible.


Caution

To lead you, please use the following information:

1- We announce this retreat to everybody as much as we can, scattering this flyer from planes and ships.
2- Military officers are going to the jungle to lead you all.
3- Even if a military officer does not come up to lead you, please contact a U.S. Army platoon or barracks. You can also appear on the motor vehicle road. Carry a white flag and show it clearly.
4- Please leave any weapons behind."

One mystery is the reference to "Mr Ohuchiyama", I have never heard of or found any reference to anyone by that name. Another note, the flyer didn't work to well; Shoichi Yokoi was the last soldier on Guam to surrender on Sept 24, 1972!

http://mattstodayinhistory.blogspot.com/2007/01/last-japanese-holdout-on-guam-january.html

Hope you enjoyed this
-Mike

Dave
23rd January 2013, 04:22 PM
That is a great piece of history