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Thread: ERMA 98

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Posts
    475

    Default ERMA 98

    Three sentences, and at least 3 errors. Can you spot them?

    "All numbers are matching on the gun except for the stock, original sling, exception of the muzzle cap. Bore is in excellent condition, metal is very nice. Stock is Non-Laminate and in good condition, ..."

    http://www.gunbroker.com/item/643452932

  2. #2

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    Sure looks like a laminate stock to me....

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Mar 2016
    Posts
    427

    Default

    Sure doesn't look like the 'original sling'; the stock is definitely a replacement and I doubt the 'restocked before it was brought back' part. I'd guess sporterized stock that still had the bands. Stock is probably 3 years or so newer than the rifle. The 'muzzle cap' I'm not sure about the answer.

  4. #4

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    Any comments about a 1938 front sight base being grooved for accepting a hood?

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Mar 2016
    Posts
    427

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by GunKraut View Post
    Any comments about a 1938 front sight base being grooved for accepting a hood?
    Nice catch. That adds even more to the story. I believe even RCs left the sight bases as is. Maybe more aggressively sporterized? Then I'd wonder how he got the bands if they're legit?

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Aug 2014
    Posts
    20

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by GunKraut View Post
    Any comments about a 1938 front sight base being grooved for accepting a hood?
    Sometimes added when a rifle cycled through the depot system for rework

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Mar 2016
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    427

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by rockisle1903 View Post
    Sometimes added when a rifle cycled through the depot system for rework
    Ok cool. I was also thinking the depot route, however I know next to nothing about them other than generally how and why they operated. It would explain most everything that's wrong with this but I'd expect to see tangible signs. Or that the seller would have pointed them out. Maybe they're small and discrete?

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Posts
    542

    Default

    No interest but to play the devil's advocate: What would the Germans do with a perfectly good 38 Erma that had the stock damaged beyond repair in say 1941 or 42? Would they normally throw it away? Or, would they put on a new stock at a depot?

    Now, lets say this is a legitimate depot repair and came back in this exact condition.
    How does one prove it?
    You don't.
    If you can not verify it consider it a fake

    Fact; the Erma is a 38 with a 41 or later stock and no proof it is legit and even if we all agree it is legit that will never make it worth anything more than a maybe, possibly, could be opinion.

    Even if it had bring back papers it would need a photo of grandpa holding this gun at a demarcation site showing this gun close enough to ID the action and stock beyond a doubt.

    This may well be a legit gun but we will never be able to prove it one way or another.
    "The right to keep and bear arms should not be infringed upon, if only to prevent tyranny in government"
    Thomas Jefferson,; Constitutional debates

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