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Thread: S42G

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
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    Texas
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    19,166

    Default S42G

    Neca eos omnes. Deus suos agnoscet.

  2. #2

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    Geco barrel too. I did noticed a byf stamp on the stock as well.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
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    1,385

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    Spandau rebarrel, but should have Su inspections on the wrist.
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  4. #4

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    Interesting rifle. The bolt is a later astrawerke bolt and the font looks like JPS. WHat are the chances of finding the matching bolt from a different rifle ??

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Mar 2016
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    507

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    Wow. Interesting piece. I'm still trying to wrap my head around this. It looks to me like the only original 1935 part is the receiver and possibly a few small parts although even they seem more like '36.

    As mentioned the barrel is Geco supplied replacement. Rear sight base BSW supplied spare? Rear sight ramp looks like it was JPS 3 digit serial salvaged piece. Rear sight spring looks like droop wing possibly 63? Maybe original piece? Rest of the rear sight pieces look like Elite supplied spares. Both bands look like Astra spares.

    Now it starts getting weirder for me. Trigger guard is definitely droop wing 63, but a different 4 digits so it's not original either. Can't work out the acceptance on the FP, but it was a different serial and only 2 digits. Imperial piece maybe? As mentioned the stock is byf and P marked with a buttplate that originally had a 4 digit serial in the 'cc' block with e/655 which can only make it a 1940 piece. Bayo lug is salvage piece but can't see acceptance.

    And even more curious. So bolt is Astra replacement as mentioned yet cocking piece is e/655?

    Ok. A beat up '35 MO walks into a depot... The rebarrel I get. But how did approximately? half a '40 MO end up on there? And the bolt was bad too? Or could that have been an even later replacement?

    I'd love to hear some more experienced period rebuild guys help me understand how this came to be.

  6. #6
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    Mar 2009
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    It's simple, depots routinely salvaged components off of everything that came through the depot. I'm not sure if you are wondering how 1940 date rifle components end up on a 35 date rifle? The war was over in 1945, so there was about 5 years after the 1940 was made that it could be salvaged at a depot, thereby making the parts available to use on the 35 date rifle.

    There is no way to rationalize what parts were used on depot repair rifles, or when/why certain parts were replaced vs. reused. If re barreled, it's possible the barrel burst and damaged the bolt? Or was damaged itself. There is so many scenarios where rifles were damaged and reused/rebuilt, the possible combinations are endless.

    No depot repair rifle is the same, I can tell you that. I can also be 100% sure this is a Spandau rework based on the firing proof and bolt numbering.
    Buy the Karabiner98k and Kriegsmodell book direct from the authors - www.thirdpartypress.com

  7. #7
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    Mar 2016
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    Thanks for the added info. I already knew some of what you said, just by simple math and economics. Original rifle had 10 years of service and the salvaged parts 5 as you pointed out.

    I think maybe my point was more along the lines of could this odd combination be a result of 2 repairs over those 10 years. Maybe the rebarrel and bolt done together (Spandau) and the different stock with it's bands done later when the stock was somehow destroyed?

    You know it's Spandau because of some unique detail in the FP? and that font is pretty unique too. Especially that 1 and even the 0 is quite flat almost like an o

  8. #8
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    Mar 2009
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    It's possible it was updated again later, but nothing on the stock shows any inspections from other depots- on depot repairs, the stock holds most of the information, and sanded or altered stocks eliminate the ability to nail down home many times it was reworked. I have some rifles that went through multiple reworks and stocks show the different depot markings.

    Yes, Spandau was the only one to put the firing proof in that location and used that particular ragged looking proof (it was done later too based on what I've seen, impossible to know the dates).
    Buy the Karabiner98k and Kriegsmodell book direct from the authors - www.thirdpartypress.com

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