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Thread: Poor guy. I feel sorry for him

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
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    Default Poor guy. I feel sorry for him

    http://gk43forum.com/forum/showthread.php?t=11485

    That's gotta suck bad. 5G's and crap like this happening. I'm so glad I spent the money I was saving up for one of these on the NDM-86 instead. I don't think a PTR would stand up to my abuse. I hope it works out for him.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
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    1,908

    Default

    That "steel" looks sub fricken par...

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
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    It defenitely looks "stringy" for lack of a better word. The one my buddy has was a jamomatic at first but it seems to have worn in and is reliable now. He's only put maybe 300 rounds through it though. I'd have several thousand rounds piled up by now if I owned one and, knowing my luck, it would go kaplooey on me. I so badly wanted these to work out for everyone. It's just a shame.

  4. #4

    Default

    I don't feel sorry for him, guys are shooting blanks that "should" work with the gas system. So far 2 guns have had this issue, both shoot blanks primarily. Just think about what is happening, the blank is being fired and gas is returning fast enough that the bolt is not unlocking before the metal gives and the hooks are ripped off. Should they be built so the barrel bulges before this happens? No one can say what types of ammo we shoot out our guns, there are NO plans to reproduce carriers as of yet, only bolts.
    Kevin

  5. #5

    Default Fatigue Fracture

    Quote Originally Posted by Wilhelm View Post
    It defenitely looks "stringy" for lack of a better word. The one my buddy has was a jamomatic at first but it seems to have worn in and is reliable now. He's only put maybe 300 rounds through it though. I'd have several thousand rounds piled up by now if I owned one and, knowing my luck, it would go kaplooey on me. I so badly wanted these to work out for everyone. It's just a shame.
    The metal "broke" from a fatigue fracture which is caused by repeated stresses. The "stringy" look is what the metal exhibits from a typical fatigue fracture. The stresse resulted from repeated "hammering" of the operating rod. The gas pressure was probably set too high and excessive force was imparted to the op rod which caused it to slam into the receiver. The force which it was struck was large that it was designed to carry resulting it the fracture of the metal.

    Bill

  6. #6

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by BigBoy99 View Post
    The metal "broke" from a fatigue fracture which is caused by repeated stresses. The "stringy" look is what the metal exhibits from a typical fatigue fracture. The stresse resulted from repeated "hammering" of the operating rod. The gas pressure was probably set too high and excessive force was imparted to the op rod which caused it to slam into the receiver. The force which it was struck was large that it was designed to carry resulting it the fracture of the metal.

    Bill
    Your right, he shoots tons of blanks, does not reload them himself and relies on them to not blow up his gun.

  7. #7

    Default

    It's REALLY easy to apply too much gas pressure to the action when using a blank adapter on the muzzle. There is no easy way to determine if the gas pressure is too high and beating the hell out of your bolt-carrier/bolt/etc. If the ejected cases are flying into earth orbit, that's strong evidence that the pressure is too high, but when ejection distances are normal, and you shoot a LOT of blanks at reenactments like I do, you could do serious damage and not realize you are doing it. It is really important to use blanks that are consistent in powder load (buy from ONE supplier you trust or make your own) and set the adapter's orifice size accordingly for those specific blanks. It's a shame that some reenactors know so little about the mechanism of their own guns and beat historically collectibles into junk through outright ignorance. The G43 is commonly wrecked by reenactor bubbas. Because of its inherent weaknesses, it is doubly susceptible to bubba damage. The MP-44 less so, and since the cartridge is lighter, and corresponding blank powder loads are less than a full size rifle, it is easier to load blanks in the safe range of powder load. That does not mean you should not carefully examine the powder loads you use in your PTR-44, but chances are better that you are in the ball park when doing test shots, and observing the sound, ejection distance, and apparent travel of the bolt carrier (using tape on the handle slot or some other indicating method), and trying to gage if your blank loads are proper for the blank adapter orifice size. The amount of rounds reenactors shoot is often much more than live rounds target shooters fire, which is a factor in how much wear and tear you place on the gun, and the life of its parts.

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